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Gender and Globalization in Asia and the PacificMethod, Practice, Theory$
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Kathy E. Ferguson and Monique Mironesco

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824831592

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824831592.001.0001

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“Licentiousness has slain its hundreds of thousands”

“Licentiousness has slain its hundreds of thousands”

The Missionary Discourse of Sex, Death, and Disease in Nineteenth-century Hawai‘i

Chapter:
(p.37) Chapter 3 “Licentiousness has slain its hundreds of thousands”
Source:
Gender and Globalization in Asia and the Pacific
Author(s):

Virginia Metaxas

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824831592.003.0003

This chapter focuses on the 1830s as a moment in which a troubled and overtaxed traditional Hawaiian medical system began to consider and incorporate western medicine. It approaches this study of nineteenth-century epidemics and the shifting paradigms of medical ideas and practice in the context of social history—with particular interest in the ways people experienced, interpreted, and acted against the seemingly inevitable power of disease and death. The chapter's examination reveals the ways that missionary or western-influenced English writers framed explanations of this population disaster in terms of gender and race, and how ideas about disease and healing were transformed under nineteenth-century American imperialist influence.

Keywords:   western medicine, Hawaiian medical system, epidemics, disease, healing, American imperialism, imperialist influence, gender, race

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