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Excursions in IdentityTravel and the Intersection of Place, Gender, and Status in Edo Japan$
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Laura Nenzi

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824831172

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824831172.001.0001

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At the Intersection of Travel and Gender

At the Intersection of Travel and Gender

Chapter:
(p.45) Chapter 2 At the Intersection of Travel and Gender
Source:
Excursions in Identity
Author(s):

Laura Nenzi

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824831172.003.0002

This chapter discusses how gender determined one’s ability to be mobile and to access specific spaces in the Edo period. Political discourse mapped the spaces of travel by intersecting the parallels of gender with the meridians of status, devoting great attention to the distinction between male and female travelers, between individuals of high or low standing, between active players and simple pawns in the economy, and between involved or relatively disengaged members of society. Along the roads, however, some of these theoretical distinctions became less clear, or were defined differently. Where political necessities drew lines of separation, actual practice blurred them; where administrators were blind to differences, common sense distinguished them clearly.

Keywords:   gender, Edo period, mobility, status, female travelers, travel

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