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We Fought the Navy and WonGuam's Quest for Democracy$
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Doloris Coulter Cogan

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824830892

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824830892.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM HAWAII SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.hawaii.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Hawaii University Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in HSO for personal use (for details see http://www.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 23 July 2017

Welcome to Guam

Welcome to Guam

Chapter:
(p.1) Chapter 1 Welcome to Guam
Source:
We Fought the Navy and Won
Author(s):

Doloris Coulter Cogan

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824830892.003.0001

This chapter describes the geography, history, and culture of Guam. Guam is the southernmost and largest of the fifteen islands in the Marianas archipelago. With 209 square miles of landmass, Guam constitutes 20 percent of the entire dry land of Micronesia and is the most useful for shipping, communications, and military purposes. Guam's first contact with the West occurred in March 1521 when Ferdinand Magellan and his crew spotted land that would later come to be known as Rota and Guam. It was almost 150 years after the arrival of Magellan that Spain laid claim to the Mariana Islands in 1665; serious colonizing began in 1668. On August 12, 1898, a protocol was signed Spain agreed to give up Cuba, cede Puerto Rico and Guam to the United States, and permit the United States to occupy the city, bay, and harbor at Manila pending a peace treaty to determine the control, disposition, and government of the Philippines.

Keywords:   Guam, Philippines, Spain, colonization, Ferdinand Magellan

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