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EthnoburbThe New Ethnic Community in Urban America$
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Wei Li

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824830656

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824830656.001.0001

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Portraits of Ethnoburban Chinese

Portraits of Ethnoburban Chinese

Chapter:
(p.150) 7 Portraits of Ethnoburban Chinese
Source:
Ethnoburb
Author(s):

Wei Li

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824830656.003.0007

This chapter examines the trajectories of some ethnoburban subgroups by providing portraits of individual Chinese immigrants in order to personalize the hurdled masses of Chinese residents and business owners in San Gabriel Valley in 2000. It first takes a look at American-born Chinese (that is, native-born Americans of Chinese descent), many of whom fit the model minority profile, who left Los Angeles's inner-city neighborhoods for Monterey Park. It then considers the experiences of immigrants from Taiwan, Hong Kong, and mainland China who settled in Los Angeles and how these transmigrants succeeded in their business ventures in the area. It also discusses the story of one Chinese immigrant, Henry Y. Hwang, who served as chairman of the board of the Far East National Bank. By focusing on the stories of Hwang and other ethnoburban Chinese, the chapter shows how their personal lives were intertwined with global, national, and local factors and events.

Keywords:   ethnoburb, Chinese immigrants, San Gabriel Valley, American-born Chinese, model minority, Los Angeles, Monterey Park, transmigrants, Henry Y. Hwang, Far East National Bank

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