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Japan and the League of NationsEmpire and World Order, 1914-1938$
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Thomas W. Burkman

Print publication date: 2007

Print ISBN-13: 9780824829827

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824829827.001.0001

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The Geneva Years

The Geneva Years

Chapter:
(p.104) 5 The Geneva Years
Source:
Japan and the League of Nations
Author(s):

Thomas W. Burkman

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824829827.003.0005

This chapter looks at the events of 1923–1925 in Geneva and Locarno, which may be seen as a turning point in Japan’s relationship to universal order. Japan reacted to the Draft Treaty by asserting the primacy of the League over regional security arrangements. Two years later, Japan rejected the Protocol, which would have applied a common security regimen to disputes anywhere in the world, and heralded a new model of regional comity embodied in the Locarno Treaties. The seminal nature of this shift was hardly apparent to actors and observers in the mid-1920s. However, viewed from the vantage point of history, this change bears momentous meaning as a precursor of things to come.

Keywords:   universal order, Draft Treaty, regional security, Protocol, common security, regional comity, Locarno Treaties

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