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Bodhisattvas of the Forest and the Formation of the MahayanaA Study and Translation of the Rastrapalapariprccha-sutra$
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Daniel Boucher

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780824828813

Published to Hawaii Scholarship Online: November 2016

DOI: 10.21313/hawaii/9780824828813.001.0001

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“Profit and Honor”

“Profit and Honor”

A Critique of Sedentary Monasticism

Chapter:
(p.64) Chapter Four “Profit and Honor”
Source:
Bodhisattvas of the Forest and the Formation of the Mahayana
Author(s):

Daniel Boucher

Publisher:
University of Hawai'i Press
DOI:10.21313/hawaii/9780824828813.003.0004

This chapter discusses a critique of the authors of the Rāṣṭrapāla, which set out to defend the Buddha's Dharma against the tide of monastic laxity and wantonness to which they saw it succumbing. Accusing their monastic confrères of fawning after patrons and consorting with householders, they describe a saṅgha that had accommodated itself to its socioeconomic environment with considerable aplomb. And they were, to say the least, not very happy about this. The Rāṣṭrapāla is in many ways a Puritan tract, portraying its authors' disillusionment with what the institution of Buddhist monasticism had become in their day. Like the sixteenth- and seventeenth-century reformers in the Church of England, they championed an ascetic vision, a return to the righteous times of the first disciples.

Keywords:   monastic laxity, wantonness, Buddhist monasticism, ascetic disciplines, Rāṣṭrapāla, socioeconomic environment, disillusionment

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